Dating german beer steins

As progress continued in the refinement of earthenware, a new material developed called stoneware.

Dating german beer steins

About this time many efforts were also made to improve the earthenware material used for steins.The laws, and others related to sanitary conditions, were in reaction to the fear that a recurrence of the bubonic plague, also called the Black Death, would be caused by several invasions of flies throughout Central Europe in the mid to late fifteenth century.Up until that time, most common folk drank beer from mugs made of porous earthenware or wood.Pewter was not only used for lids, but also as a primary body material.It was the material of choice throughout large areas of Europe and particularly popular in England.

Dating german beer steins

By raising the firing temperature, clay was vitrified into a solid, moisture-free, stone-like material called stoneware.Because this new material was much more durable than the previous earthenware, steins made of stoneware became very popular and many different types of designs and decorations were artistically applied to them. The etymology of the word is either from “Stein Krug” (meaning stone jug/mug) or from “Steingut” (meaning stone goods). They have a handle and a hinged lid; are decorated and sometimes hand-painted.The origins of beer steins date back to the 14th century.As a result of the bubonic plague and several invasions of flies throughout Europe, Germany established several laws in the early 16th century requiring that all food and beverage containers be covered to protect their contents.Europeans often engraved dates on the lids of steins to commemorate specific occasions, such as birthdays, anniversaries, sporting events, weddings, and retirements.

Stein materials The history of steins includes the development and introduction of several different materials other than stoneware.Relatively expensive, the stoneware lidded drinking vessels soon became the subjects of Renaissance artists that added designs making them even more appealing.Early German beer steins from the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries often had: By the mid seventeenth century, German beer and stoneware beer steins were in high demand.The German faience steins were: Many German beer stein makers continued making faience steins throughout the eighteenth century.At the same time, European porcelain had been perfected and the costly German porcelain beer steins were in demand by Germany's wealthiest families.

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